Hot Tub Benefits

Hot Tub Benefits

Soak Your Care, Aches and Stress Away

Soaking in a hot tub brings many health benefits. After a few minutes in the tub, blood vessels dilate, which lowers blood pressure. Soaking also provides buoyancy, reducing the workload for your body and heart by 10 to 20 percent. As the body goes through this process, muscles relax, temporarily relieving pain. The body begins sweating, ridding it of toxins. The heat and pressure from the jets raise the level of antibodies and white blood cells, promoting the healing process.

Simply put, hydrotherapy is the therapeutic use of warm water – a proven, natural remedy. Whether it’s to unwind from the complexities of everyday life or to rejuvenate sore muscles and joints caused by sports or arthritis pain, hydrotherapy can help you feel better – naturally.

Here are just a few of the benefits of hot tub soaking. Come in to our showrooms for a free test soak – and see for yourself!

  • Easing Back Pain

    Immersion in a hot tub raises the body temperature and causes the blood vessels to dilate, increasing circulation. The buoyancy of the spa water reduces body weight by approximately 90%, which relieves pressure on joints and muscles and creates the relaxing sensation of weightlessness.

    The massaging action of a spa is created by sending a mixture of warm water and air through hydromassage jet nozzles. This “energized” stream of water loosens tight muscles and stimulates the release of endorphins, the body’s natural pain killers.

    In 1995, a study published in the British Journal of Rheumatology offered evidence that hot tub therapy has both short- and long-term benefits for people with lower back pain. A later study, published in the Journal of Rheumatology by a group of researchers in France, sought to conform these results and quantify the overall benefits of spa therapy.

    After three weeks of consistent spa therapy, examinations showed more improvement in the health status (as measured in pain duration and intensity and back flexibility) of the spa treatment group than of the medication-only group. After six months, significant improvement continued in the spa therapy group. In addition, their use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs had decreased.

  • Promotion of Healing

    The jet action found in spas can promote healing by providing even more oxygen to the area than is provided by warm water alone. The heat and pressure from the jets can also raise the level of antibodies and white blood cells delivered to the area, promoting the destruction of bad cells and stimulating the formation of new tissue.

  • Enhancing Sleep

    Experts recommend that anyone wanting to induce sleep (especially those being kept up by pain) soak in water of approximately 103 degrees Fahrenheit about two hours before bedtime.

    Studies suggest that immersion in hot water (such as a hot tub which has a constant temperature) before bedtime can ease the transition into a deeper, more restful sleep. This may be due to a temperature shift, since the body’s core internal thermostat drops after leaving the water, which signals the body that it’s time to sleep. Or, the sleep improvement may be related to hot water’s relaxing properties – the buoyancy of water reduces body weight by approximately 90%, relieving pressure on joints and muscles, creating the sensation of weightlessness. The hot, swirling water leaves you feeling both mentally and emotionally relaxed.

    In addition, hot tub-induced sleep is a natural remedy, unlike alternative sleeping aids such as prescription drugs, over-the-counter remedies and alcohol – all of which can make you feel groggy and have other adverse side effects.

    Just how much can a hot tub enhance your sleep? Researchers are still finding out. And to help their efforts along, Hot Spring Spas has formed a partnership with the National Sleep Foundation to help support sleep research, community education programs and fundraising activities

  • Temporary pain relief

    As the body tries to register a temperature change, the central nervous system becomes depressed, contributing to muscle relaxation and temporarily relieving, or at least lessening, pain. This can happen with any drastic change in temperature – hot or cold – but most people are more comfortable sitting in warm water than holding an ice pack. (Remember, for recent injuries where there is swelling or broken skin, an ice pack is more suitable.)

  • Muscle relaxation

    This occurs when the warm blood reaches deeper and deeper into the muscles, causing the vessels to expand. The muscle-relaxation effects of hot water also help deaden muscle pain by easing any pinching of nerves or blood vessels, and by helping the muscle rid itself of lactic acid and other metabolic wastes.

  • Controlling Diabetes

    According to the American Diabetes Association, over 15.7 million Americans are diabetic. Tight control of blood glucose (sugar) levels is the only defense against the many problems and side effects that come from diabetes.

    Recent studies published in the September 16, 1999 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine give new hope to the millions who suffer from diabetes. It stated that “hot tub therapy” helped a group of Type 2 diabetics reduce their blood sugar levels and improve sleep patterns. The effects of partial immersion in a hot tub simulate the beneficial effects of exercise. Physical exercise is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    An independent study led by Dr. Philip L. Hooper at the McKee Medical Center in Loveland, Colorado studied a group of Type 2 diabetes patients for three weeks. The patients were required to soak in a hot tub for thirty minutes a day, six days a week, for the duration of the study. The results were astounding! The patients’ average blood sugar levels were reduced by an average of 13 percent. Hooper also explained that one of the subjects was able to reduce his daily dose of insulin by 18 percent after only ten days of the study.

    In reference to these findings, Dr. Hooper states that hot tubs are especially helpful for patients who are unable to exercise, and recommends that hot tub treatments should be included as regular therapy for patients with diabetes.

  • Reducing Weight

    An article that appeared in the September 16, 1999 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine followed a group of subjects who were required to soak in a hot tub for thirty minutes a day, six days a week, for three weeks. Though this study was for diabetes research, the results were wide-reaching. The patients’ weight was reduced by an average of 3.75 pounds! The subjects lost over one pound per week, just by soaking in a spa.

    Regular use of hot tubs can also help to diminish the appearance of cellulite. The fatty deposits that typically gather on the hips, thighs and buttocks of most women past their 30s can never be fully eliminated. The design of a woman’s body naturally causes the skin to dimple out, whether she is overweight or thin. However, by improving circulation to the areas affected by cellulite, it has been proven that the appearance of the unsightly deposits can be reduced.

    According to a variety of medical sources available on the Internet, the hydrotherapy that a hot tub provides stimulates the blood vessels, increasing circulation. It also tones the body tissue, reduces fluid retention and relieves swelling. All of these benefits combined can result in the diminishment of the appearance of cellulite.

  • Easing Arthritis Pain

    According to a publication from The Arthritis Foundation, Spas, Pools, and Arthritis, “Regular sessions in your hot tub help keep joints moving. It restores and preserves strength and flexibility, and also protects your joints from further damage. Exercise can also improve a person’s coordination, endurance, and the ability to perform daily tasks, and can lead to an enhanced sense of self-esteem and accomplishment.”

    “A hot tub fulfills the need perfectly . . . providing the warmth, massage, and buoyancy that is so necessary to the well-being of arthritis sufferers. The buoyancy of the water supports and lessens stress on the joints and encourages freer movement. Water exercises may even act as a resistance to help build muscle strength.”

  • Athletic Benefits

    Before You Exercise. Soaking in a hot tub before exercising relaxes your body and loosens muscles, making exercise easier and reducing the risk of injury. A pre-exercise soak will also help improve performance. In fact, some golfers swear it has actually taken a couple of strokes off their game.

    After You Exercise. Soaking in a hot tub after exercising is a great way to wind down and relax your muscles. The hot, swirling water embraces you . . . massaging your neck, shoulders, arms, back, thighs, calves, and feet. But most importantly, hot tub use after you exercise will greatly reduce or even eliminate the stiffness typically felt the next day.

  • Reducing Stress

    A soothing and relaxing soak in a hot tub can help counteract stress and its effects on the human body. It is the perfect antidote to a hectic and stressful lifestyle. The warm waters and soothing massage work to relieve anxiety and relax your tense muscles.

    Numerous independent studies have proven that a warm water massage stimulates the release of endorphins, the body’s natural “feel good” chemical. Your hot tub will enhance your sense of well being, and leave you feeling fresh, clean, and ready to tackle life’s daily challenges.

  • Detoxify the Body

    In trying to regain its normal temperature, the body will begin sweating so that moisture on the skin will evaporate and cool the body. Soaking in hot water causes capillaries to dilate and increases blood flow, which pushes the heart to pump faster. Increased circulation helps rid the body of toxins.

  • Hot Tub Exercise Guide

    Priming the muscles. By relaxing muscles, hot water helps increase their range of motion to allow for gentle exercise and stretching in the spa.

  • Choose from our amazing spa selection

    The simple truth is, nothing relaxes like a Hot Spring spa.
    Because no other spa has the same wide variety of unique jets, intelligently designed and engineered to optimize your enjoyment.

  • Systematic Soothing

    The Hot Spring spa experience is much more than the sum of its jets. The highly efficient hot tub pump and manifold plumbing system evenly distribute the water flow to each and every jet. By designing our own jets and optimizing the plumbing system, we’ve minimized restrictions in the water flow, providing every jet the power to give you an incredible massage.

    Besides a wide variety of hot tub jets, we also give you many ways to use them. Our exclusive SmartJet® system lets you divert water to different combinations of jets to customize your hydromassage experience. Selecting hot tub jet combinations and fine tuning the feel is as easy as turning the attractive SmartJet lever.
    The Comfort Control® system lets you adjust our spa jets in two ways—either with an easy twist of a jet faceplate or a simple push of a topside lever.
    View our amazing hot tub jets in action. Or schedule a test soak at our showroom.
    The Hydromassage Experience

    There are three factors at work in a spa: heat, buoyancy and massage. Together, they create a relaxing, soothing experience.
    Immersion in hot water raises the body temperature and causes the blood vessels to dilate, increasing circulation. The buoyancy of the water reduces body weight by approximately 90%, which relieves pressure on joints and muscles and creates the relaxing sensation of weightlessness.

    The massaging action of a spa is created by sending a mixture of warm water and air through jet nozzles. This “energized” stream of water loosens tight muscles and stimulates the release of endorphins, the body’s natural pain killers.

    Of course, a spa offers much more than just a good hydromassage. It can also be good for your health. “Research shows that both the body and mind benefit from the simple act of immersion in warm water.” The Hot Water & Healthy Living book summarizes the present knowledge about the many health benefits that result from immersion in water.